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Tuesday, 7 September 2010

Consider cheap macro lager


Inspired by Oliver Thring.

You could argue that people take beer for granted. Saturday afternoons in front of the football, summer BBQ’s or a day at the beach; all occasions on which beer is routinely bought, all too often with little thought, care or consideration. The latest supermarket deal is snapped up, guzzled down and discarded with yesterday’s newspaper. The more I think about macro lager, the harder it becomes to accept it as harmless and innocent.

A hundred shades of yellow, somehow all different but all the same. Fierce, aggressive carbonation, guilt ridden bubbles of gas fighting to escape the liquid and hide their shame. A vacant void where the aroma should be. A flavour noticeable by its absence, instantly recognisable but bereft of any character, depth or distinction. Filtered, pasteurised, killed. A lifeless liquid, the ghost of something once great, it’s haunting of shelf and fridge like a desperate last attempt to be remembered.

How did beer end up like this? How has something, so important to so many, been allowed to degenerate into a shadow of its former self? We’re a nation of beer drinkers and of beer brewers! We’ve a proud history of making some of the best beer in the entire world, but we’re losing sight of that. And for what? To save a few quid at Tesco?

Beer crafted with skill, artistry and consideration is an unbeatable thing. Be it a roasty porter, pithy IPA or zingy summer ale, good beer can deliver a spectrum of flavour as diverse as the wildest imagination. Capable, with ease, of slaking the thirst and hitting the spot that you buy that macro lager for; real beer is a living product that continues to mature, change and develop with time.

Beer is the most important drink in Britain. Whilst it might feel comforting to pick up that familiar brand over and over again, what a shame it would be if nothing else existed. A beer renaissance is happening under our noses, there's never been a better time for you to make that change. Next time time you pick up that slab, think about what you're doing, you're worth more than this.

8 comments:

Eddie said...

Quality stuff Mark.

Tandleman said...

Er yes, but most of the people picking up the slabs of beer are, regrettably, quite happy with what they are doing.

Sadly the majority are lost to good beer and are likely to stay so. We need quality beer at both the geek and the cheap ends of the market, but that's a difficult one to solve.

Still we must keep chipping away.

Barm said...

Many, perhaps most, basic foodstuffs are debased. Tasteless sliced bread that smells of vinegar. Floppy, dripping wet bacon and ham that only taste of salt. Cheese barely worthy of the name. Chickens whose miserable lives produce miserable meat. It's not just beer. All we can do is encourage all efforts by producers and consumers of all kinds of foods to get people eating and drinking better stuff.

Cooking Lager said...

"Beer is the most important drink in Britain"

Tosh, tea is.

Mark said...

Eddie: Thanks, appreciate it. :)

Tandleman, Barm: Beer Evangelism?

Cookie: You might have a point, although I'd have put you down as a Stella over PG Tips man myself!

Barm said...

Well, beer evangelism is what we do already, isn't it?

Scyrene said...

Aside from beer being the *most* important drink in Britain, I couldn't agree more! I think some people know no better, some people don't like being challenged, and some people care about money above all else. Still, we've passed the worst I think - there's a renaissance in almost every aspect of food and drink now. It's a good time to be drinking (and eating) :)

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